Spring Grass

“He was only in the pasture for three hours yesterday afternoon,” Concerned Horse Owner told her vet. “I thought he would enjoy some fresh green grass.”

The big bay gelding had laminitis.

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Got Colostrum?

Be prepared. That should be the motto of every horse owner expecting a mare to foal.

If you are one of the thousands expecting a foal this spring, are you prepared for the loss of the dam or the possibility she will have no milk?

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Calories for the Horse

The calculations for the amount of energy in your horse’s diet (and yours) is based on a platinum-iridium bar made in 1885.

That bar weighs exactly one kilogram (1,000 grams or about 2.2 pounds). It is kept at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures near Paris, France. Copies of the bar are kept at various governmental weights and measures agencies around the world.

What does that bar have to do with energy in a diet? It is the international standard for the metric system. The metric system is used in nutrition calculations.

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Thrush

Over the years we develop many habits – some good and some not so good.
Habits are behaviors which become automatic over years of repetitiveness. Adding a new habit to our daily routine takes effort and concentration.

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Preparing your saddle for Spring

Every winter, usually in late February, we get a few days of warm weather which reminds us of spring.  This year will be no different and we use those days to catch up on outside work or repairs.  For me, it is a time to spend some time getting my tack and saddles ready for the new riding season.

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No More Horses!

There are certain combinations that are irresistible.
German chocolate cake and mocha ice cream.
Staying in bed 15 minutes longer on a cold, rainy morning.
Horses at auction and your daughter.
Because I am older and wiser now, I can tell you with certainty, “Never go to an auction with your daughter.” (My father told me many times: “Do as Daddy says, not as Daddy does, and be the man Daddy should of was.”)

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The Equine Intestine

Why is small 60 feet in length and large only 25 feet?
It’s a question about the equine intestine that could keep you awake at night. When you know the answer you’ll sleep more soundly.
A horse’s meal leaves the stomach through the pyloric sphincter and enters the small intestine – a tube that is approximately 60 feet in length and holds about 15 gallons of material.

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