Author: Tom Seay

Secret to a Lifetime of Safe Trail Rides

As we begin the new riding season, I want to make a few suggestions about medical emergencies for both horses and for people.  I am 100% sure there will be a few e-mails with suggestions or criticisms, but this is an important subject where we can all contribute through experience. Later in this article, I have serious advice for every trail rider, regardless of age or experience.

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A New Experience:  Cattle Drives in the East!

Winter is finally over.   All of us have been waiting for the weather to break so we can travel to new places with our horses.  Just as we think Spring is here, we have a new problem which will affect more people than Covid. The economy has taken a dive.  Fuel prices have skyrocketed.  Food prices (including shortages) are hitting new highs.  Farmers are slapped with unprecedented fertilizer bills, which will hurt you soon on hay and grain costs.  That trip you were planning with your horse and friends out west has all but evaporated.

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Do Not “Un-Winterize” Just Yet

When I was growing up on our dairy farm in Virginia, Dad would remind us that every February, there was always a week or so of very mild weather. Everyone would be tempted to feel that spring was arriving. However, the worst snowstorms we ever had was the beginning of March. Last year, during early March, I was convinced sub- freezing weather was over and turned the horse stall waterers back on and unwinterized our trailer for an upcoming trip.

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Don’t neglect your horse during the holidays

All of us are busy during the month of December, especially in preparation for Christmas, New Years and family visits. Because of this, we may unintentionally neglect our horses. It is easy to neglect our horses quite by accident.  Most of the care we give all year can be offset by the new cold weather.  Here is why:  Many of our horses are pastured all year but when winter and the cold arrives, we begin feeding hay.  The hay seemed great when we put it in the barn but a leaky roof or being baled with a high degree of moisture. During the late summer and fall, mold can form that you can not see.   All of us seem to look at the price of hay instead of the quality.

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