Month: February 2019

Riding Right with Julie Goodnight

Dear Julie,

I’m 15 and have been riding for 11 years. I just bought a Halflinger pony that stands at 14.2. He’s a pleasure to own but rests his head on the reins and often pulls. I would like to find out a way to get him lighter on the reins with lighter contact—but without him zooming off when I’m schooling him. I’ve tried lots of things. One trainer recommended that I put my rein and hand up on his neck then bring it back and repeat the process on the other side. This does reduce his resting on the reins a little but it also encourages him to take off in a fast trot.

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Upward Transitions

In this article we will incorporate upward transitions from a jog/trot to a halt and the upward transition of the halt to jog/trot in the pattern. I’ll explain the aids the rider should use to keep her horse “straight” on the circles. I’ll conclude with some tips on how to improve communication with a horse that does not have complete knowledge of the rider’s aids.

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No More Horses!

There are certain combinations that are irresistible.
German chocolate cake and mocha ice cream.
Staying in bed 15 minutes longer on a cold, rainy morning.
Horses at auction and your daughter.
Because I am older and wiser now, I can tell you with certainty, “Never go to an auction with your daughter.” (My father told me many times: “Do as Daddy says, not as Daddy does, and be the man Daddy should of was.”)

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The Equine Intestine

Why is small 60 feet in length and large only 25 feet?
It’s a question about the equine intestine that could keep you awake at night. When you know the answer you’ll sleep more soundly.
A horse’s meal leaves the stomach through the pyloric sphincter and enters the small intestine – a tube that is approximately 60 feet in length and holds about 15 gallons of material.

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